The Gold (Music) Room at I’olani Palace in Hawai’i is Finally Restored and Now Open to the Public!

Well, after years of restoration and hunting down valuable personal items from the Hawaiian monarchy the Gold (Music) Room at I’olani Palace is finally done.

The public will be able to have their chance to view some amazing pieces within the Gold Room starting today on April 18, 2011.   KITV news has a report about this re-opening of the Gold Room so please click the link here to watch.

To learn more about I’olani Palace please click the link here.  To learn more about the ongoing palace restoration and other items that are still missing (they would like to have back, thank you very much) please click the links here and here.  

Palace objects sold and dispersed at public auction have been recovered from 36 states and 4 foreign countries — from porcelain plates returned from Australia, and a table found in the Governor’s mansion in Iowa, to a chair in a local thrift store. The quest to find original Palace furnishings and artifacts continues. Many original furnishings are still missing. (I\’olani Palace)

Photos:  Author’s own.

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The Merrie Monarch Festival 2011: A Yearly Event in Honor of and Dedicated to His Majesty King Kalākaua of Hawai’i

For those of you who live in Hawai’i or plan on visiting the Big Island of Hawai’i (specifically Hilo) I just wanted to remind you that the Merrie Monarch Festival will take place on April 24-30, 2011.

The festival “… honors the legacy left by King David Kalākaua, who inspired the perpetuation of our traditions, native language and the arts” is something no one should miss.  Besides the world-famous hula competitions, which lasts three days, there is an arts and crafts fair as well as mega parade.

I haven’t been to the Merrie Monarch Festival in years; essentially, it’s an amazing event.  Overall, the festival is something that locals and tourists should not miss whilst in Hilo on the Big Island of Hawai’i.

To learn more about the festival and/or to purchase last minute tickets please visit their website here.

To watch past performances from the Merrie Monarch hula competitions please click the links:  Hâlau Ke Kai o Kahiki: Winners of the Kahiko performance in 2010 and Halau Na Mamo O Puuanahulu: Kahiko Winners, Women

Photos courtesy of: Fine Art America by Rod Cameron and Merrie Monarch.com

Remembering Princess Ka’iulani at the Royal Mausoleum of Hawaii

On March 31, 2011, at the Royal Mausoleum of Hawai’i in Honolulu, Hawai’i members of the Princess Ka’iulani Project as well as international researchers and well-known scholars will hold a tribute and remembrance ceremony for the late Princess of Hawai’i starting at 6pm Hawai’i time.  Various bands will play including Hamish Douglas Burgess of the Maui Celtic.  After the service, the participants will part-take in a roundtable discussion about the Princess.

To learn more about the incredible and lovely Princess Ka’iulani as well as to learn more about the amazing people at the Princess Ka’uilani Project please click the link:  Official Website

Photo courtesy of: The Princess Ka\’iulani Project

A Hawaiian Scavenger Hunt: A Princess Seeks Palace Treasures

Here is an interesting article from the Wall Street Journal newspaper, published on February 19, 2011, that I believe many may enjoy reading regarding the Hawaiian royal family and valuable artifacts.

Here is a snippet:

Abigail Kawananakoa has been on a decades-long treasure hunt—a bid to recover silverware, lamps, rare furniture and other assorted objects from her family’s former home.  Make that ‘palace.’

This 84-year-old is a princess—a descendant of the royal family that ruled the former nation of Hawaii more than a century ago, presiding from graceful I’olani Palace in downtown Honolulu.

But much of the 19th-century palace’s custom-made furniture, oil paintings and other treasures disappeared after January 1893, when a small band of businessmen overthrew the monarchy.

‘We’d love the king’s bed back,’ says Princess Abigail, the great grand-niece of Queen Kapiolani, who was married to the last King of Hawaii, David Kalakaua. His gilt-and-ebonized bed, made by the Boston-based A.H. Davenport Co., is one major item still missing. “We’ve had so many leads, and they’ve all been dead ends,” the princess says.

Built in 1882, I’olani Palace was richly furnished when it was the home of Hawaii’s last two monarchs. But by 1969, the creaky, termite-infested Italianate palace stood vacant. The Junior League of Honolulu helped found a nonprofit group called The Friends of I’olani Palace, which ended up running the palace as a museum. They tapped Princess Abigail’s mother, Liliuokalani Kawananakoa Morris, to be the Friends’ first president.

Please click the link to read the article in its entirety:  Wall Street Journal

Photos: Author’s own.  Please DO NOT copy.

Celebration of HM King Kalakaua’s birthday at I’olani Palace

On November 16, 2010 I’olani Palace had a royal birthday to celebrate.  His Majesty King Kalakaua’s birthday that is.

The royal guards marched in front of his amazing palace, centered in downtown Honolulu, as Prince David Kawananakoa and Princess Regina Kawananakoa looked on from the palace balcony.  Even though the Hawaiian monarchy ceased to exist on January 17, 1893, thanks to the illegal overthrow, descendants of the royal Hawaiian bloodline are still respected and dearly loved by the people of Hawaii.

Reviewing of the guard. Permission of use pending from I’olani Palace.

HM King Kalakaua, also known as the Merrie Monarch, would have been 174 years young.

If you ever have a chance to visit Oahu I highly recommend that you take a day to visit I’olani Palace.  It is an amazing place.

I’olani Palace
Hawaiian Monarchy Coat of Arms. Author’s own photo.

More information, history, and news about Hawaii and its former monarchy to come soon.  So stay tuned!