A Lovely Article About the Late H.R.H. Princess Ka’iulani of Hawai’i

On April 13, 2011, writer Deborah O. Melvin wrote a nice article for the Big Island Weekly newspaper entitled,”The Shattered Vase, A Hula Drama”, about the late H.R.H. Princess Ka’iulani of Hawai’i and the new hula dance, The Shattered Vase by Kumu Paul Neves.

According to Ms. Melvin the new hula by Mr. Neves, “…focuses on the princess’adult life, her uncle King Kalakaua’s death, her aunt, Queen Lili’uokalani’s imprisonment in ‘Iolani Palace, and her trip from schooling in England to Washington, D.C.”

Please click the link here to read article in its entirety.   🙂

Photo courtesy of: Big Island Weekly

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Remembering the 1856 Royal Wedding Between H.M. King Kamehameha IV and Queen Emma of Hawai’i

On Thursday April 28, 2011, KHON2 (a news station in Hawai’i) ran a video story about the 1856 royal wedding between King Kamehameha IV and Queen Emma of Hawai’i. There is also an accompanying article, which I found incredibly interesting, so I thought I would share this information with you all.

Here is a snippet from the KHON2 article:

… 155-years ago Hawaii had its own royal wedding.

‘The really biggest royal wedding that there was, was the wedding King Kamehameha IV and Emma which took place in June of 1856,’ said Bishop Museum archivist Desoto Brown.

The couple exchanged vows at Kawaiahao Church. A procession followed with men carrying Kahili – to signify this was a wedding of royalty.  Similar to how the nobility of Europe use coats of arms.

‘And people would have been watching from a respectful distance to take part in this event they were very proud of and happy about,’ said Brown.

The only depiction of the royal wedding in Bishop Museums’ collection is this sketch.  Brown says the celebration was seen as a positive an uplifting celebration for the people of Hawaii.

‘The marriage of two attractive, young Alii people was the cause for celebration.’

To mark the occasion – Queen Victoria of Great Britain sent Emma a veil, which she wore on her wedding day. And the bride most likely was dressed in a white wedding dress.

‘We don’t know the specifics but there would not have been a lot of competition as to what dress maker she was going to go to or anything like that,’ said Brown.

But it wasn’t only Queen Emma who had close ties to the British monarchy. In 1887 Queen Victoriacelebrated her Golden Jubilee and invited Hawaii’s reigning Queen Kapiolani and Princess Liliuokalani.


To watch the video clip and to read the article in its entirety please click the link here. 

Source: KHON2

Photos:  With permission from the Hawaii State Archives and my own.

The Gold (Music) Room at I’olani Palace in Hawai’i is Finally Restored and Now Open to the Public!

Well, after years of restoration and hunting down valuable personal items from the Hawaiian monarchy the Gold (Music) Room at I’olani Palace is finally done.

The public will be able to have their chance to view some amazing pieces within the Gold Room starting today on April 18, 2011.   KITV news has a report about this re-opening of the Gold Room so please click the link here to watch.

To learn more about I’olani Palace please click the link here.  To learn more about the ongoing palace restoration and other items that are still missing (they would like to have back, thank you very much) please click the links here and here.  

Palace objects sold and dispersed at public auction have been recovered from 36 states and 4 foreign countries — from porcelain plates returned from Australia, and a table found in the Governor’s mansion in Iowa, to a chair in a local thrift store. The quest to find original Palace furnishings and artifacts continues. Many original furnishings are still missing. (I\’olani Palace)

Photos:  Author’s own.

A Hawaiian Scavenger Hunt: A Princess Seeks Palace Treasures

Here is an interesting article from the Wall Street Journal newspaper, published on February 19, 2011, that I believe many may enjoy reading regarding the Hawaiian royal family and valuable artifacts.

Here is a snippet:

Abigail Kawananakoa has been on a decades-long treasure hunt—a bid to recover silverware, lamps, rare furniture and other assorted objects from her family’s former home.  Make that ‘palace.’

This 84-year-old is a princess—a descendant of the royal family that ruled the former nation of Hawaii more than a century ago, presiding from graceful I’olani Palace in downtown Honolulu.

But much of the 19th-century palace’s custom-made furniture, oil paintings and other treasures disappeared after January 1893, when a small band of businessmen overthrew the monarchy.

‘We’d love the king’s bed back,’ says Princess Abigail, the great grand-niece of Queen Kapiolani, who was married to the last King of Hawaii, David Kalakaua. His gilt-and-ebonized bed, made by the Boston-based A.H. Davenport Co., is one major item still missing. “We’ve had so many leads, and they’ve all been dead ends,” the princess says.

Built in 1882, I’olani Palace was richly furnished when it was the home of Hawaii’s last two monarchs. But by 1969, the creaky, termite-infested Italianate palace stood vacant. The Junior League of Honolulu helped found a nonprofit group called The Friends of I’olani Palace, which ended up running the palace as a museum. They tapped Princess Abigail’s mother, Liliuokalani Kawananakoa Morris, to be the Friends’ first president.

Please click the link to read the article in its entirety:  Wall Street Journal

Photos: Author’s own.  Please DO NOT copy.

Ka’iulani: Hawai’i’s Island Rose. An Article from the Smithsonian Magazine

On May 8, 2009, the Smithsonian Magazine published an article about HRH Princess Ka’iulani of Hawai’i.  Since there has always been an interest in her as well as the rest of the Hawaiian royal family I thought I would share this article with all of you in case if you have not read it before.

Click to read: Smithsonian Magazine

Source: Smithsonian Magazine.