News Regarding Her Royal Highness Princess Abigail Kinoiki Kekaulike Kawānanakoa of Hawai’i. (VIDEOS)

TheRoyalCorrespondent HawaiiCOAOn the evening of April 6, 2013, Her Royal Highness Princess Abigail Kinoiki Kekaulike Kawānanakoa of Hawai’i attended the 2013 Merrie Monarch hula competition held at the Edith Kanaka‘ole stadium in Hilo, Hawai’i.

During last night’s festivities the lovely princess “… donated $2,000 to each participating kumu hula, and $25,000 to the Merrie Monarch Festival and its president, Luana Kawelu…”  

Please click here for more information.  Or, you can watch and listen to the announcement  here (at the 7:30 mark).  Also, if you missed the 2013 Merrie Monarch Festival and would like to watch it please click here.   🙂

And, finally, if you are interested here is the 1989 documentary entitled, Kumu Hula: Keepers of Culture, that you might enjoy.

The 2013 Merrie Monarch Festival: A Yearly Event in Honor of and Dedicated to His Majesty the Late King Kalākaua of Hawai’i. (VIDEOS)

2013_large-1Well, it’s that time of year again!  It’s the 2013 Merrie Monarch Festival a yearly event which “…honors the legacy left by King David Kalākaua, who inspired the perpetuation of our traditions, native language and the arts.”  Yay!  So, yeah, every year I mention this fantastic event because, well, I can.   🙂 Moreover, it is truly a great event that everyone must see at least once in their lifetime.

With that being said, if you are interested watching the hula competitions via live stream on KFVE 5 please click here.  Live streaming of the 50th Annual Merrie Monarch Festival begins at 6PM Hawai’i time.  Or, you can watch yesterday’s event, Merrie Monarch Backstage, here.   🙂

Finally, if you are interested in learning more about the Merrie Monarch Festival please click here and here.

Poster courtesy of the Merriemonarch.com

Random Royal News Regarding the Tongan Royal Family. Plus, News Regarding the 2012 Merrie Monarch Festival in Hilo, Hawai’i.

On March 30, 2012, His Majesty King Tupou VI of Tonga announced his heir to the Tongan throne at “…his residence Liukava.” Prince ‘Ulukalala, the king’s eldest son, is now known as His Royal Highness Crown Prince Tupouto’a ‘Ulukalala of Tonga.

On April 5, 2012, members of the Tongan royal family ended their ten days of mourning by participating in the traditional hair-cutting ceremony.  To read more about today’s event as well as to view photos please click here.

Meanwhile in Hilo, Hawai’i, preparations are underway for the 2012 Merrie Monarch Festival an event which “… honors the legacy left by King David Kalākaua, who inspired the perpetuation of our traditions, native language and the arts…”

Yay!   🙂 As you may or may not know by now, I am a huge  supporter as well as fan of this week-long celebration… so yeah, I’m going to promote this amazing festival on my silly little blog.   🙂

Any way, if you are interested watching the hula competitions via live stream on KFVE 5  please click here  beginning on April 12-14 at 6pm Hawai’i time.  Or, if you happen to live on the Big Island or will be vacationing there starting April 8 why not check it out?  You won’t regret it.  For more information about the 2012 Merrie Monarch Festival please visit their official website here.

Sources: Matangi Tonga Online and Merriemonarch.com

Poster courtesy of Merriemonarch.com

Rare Photos of Edward VIII, the Prince of Wales, Surfing in Hawai’i! Plus, An Article About the Late Princess Kaʻiulani of Hawai’i

The Museum of British Surfing recently uncovered rare photos of Edward VIII, the Prince of Wales, surfing off Waikiki in 1920 with legendary Hawaiian surfer, Duke Kahanamoku.

Click here to read a great article from the Guardian newspaper and here to view the images.

To learn more about the Museum of British Surfing please visit their official website here.

And, finally, here is an interesting article about the late Princess Kaʻiulani of Hawai’i.

The Bishop Museum Celebrates the 180th Birthday of Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop

On December 18, 2011, the Bishop Museum on the island of O’ahu celebrated the birthday of Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop, founder of the Kamehameha Schools.  During Sunday’s celebrations there were performances from Hâlau Ka Leo O Laka I Ka Hikina O Ka Lâ, traditional chants, a presentation from renowned historian, DeSoto Brown, and much more.

According to president and CEO of the Bishop Museum, Blair Collins:

Were it not for the love of Bernice Pauahi Bishop and Charles Reed Bishop for the people of Hawai‘i, and the Hawaiian culture in particular, we would not exist. They feared that the native people and culture of Hawai‘i were disappearing, and the Museum was their effort to protect and preserve this heritage for future generations. It is only fitting, that in honor of Pauahi’s day of birth, we open our doors to our resident and military populations and reflect on her life and legacy.

Today, the Bishop Museum is recognized as the principal museum of the Pacific, housing the world’s largest collection of Hawaiian and Pacific artifacts and natural history specimens. More than 340,000 people visit the each year.

To watch a brief news report please click here.

To learn more about the Bishop Museum please click here  and here. By the way, if you have never been to this amazing museum I highly recommend that you do so if you happen to visit the island of O’ahu.

Press release courtesy of the Bishop Museum

‘Royalty in the Islands’: A News Story about King Kamehameha IV and Queen Emma of Hawai’i. Plus, Other News.

Here is an old news report (April 28, 2011) from KITV News in Hawai’i about the royal wedding between Their Majesties King Kamehameha IV and Queen Emma of Hawai’i.  Click here to watch the video.   🙂  By the way, the reporters mention the word Kahili in the news report, and if you don’t know what a Kahili is, it’s basically a large pole made up of native Hawaiian manu feathers on top.  

Another news report from KITV News about Hulihe’e Palace on O’ahu.  Click here to watch.

An article and video regarding Princess Abigail Kawananakoa.  Click here to read.

Finally, here is another news report about I’olani Palace.  Click here to watch.

Photos: Author’s own and the Star Bulletin.

Lei Draping Ceremony in Honor of King Kamehameha the Great

On June 10, 2011, in front of Aliʻiōlani Hale the statue of King Kamehameha the Great was “…decorated with lei[s]. Placing long strands of flowers on the statue is a long-standing tradition” honoring the great king who united the Hawaiian Islands.

As I previously mentioned, celebrations will happen throughout the islands as well as on the mainland.  Here is the schedule for those living in Hawai’i per the King Kamehameha Celebrations Commission website:

June 11, 2011 – 95th  Annual King Kamehameha Celebration Floral Parade, 9:00 A.M.
Starting at King & Richards, ending at Kapi`olani Park via Punchbowl, Ala Moana and Kalakaua Avenue

Free validated parking at Restaurant Row. Bring the family and enjoy the festivities!

Parade will broadcast live on KFVE at 9am and www.k5thehometeam.com.
Rebroadcast, June 19 at 5pm, also on KFVE.

June 11, 2011 – King Kamehameha Celebration Ho`olaule`a, Kapi`olani Park, 10:00 A.M. – 3:00 P.M.

Island of Hawai`i

June 10, 2011 – Hilo:  Statue Lei-Draping Ceremony

June 11, 2011 – Hilo:  Kamehameha Festival, Moku Ola “Coconut Island”

http://www.KamehamehaFestival.org

June 11, 2011 – Kohala:  King Kamehameha Floral Parade and Statue Lei-Draping Ceremony

http://www.KamehamehaDayCelebration.org

June 11, 2011 – Kailua Kona:  King Kamehameha Day Community Parade

http://www.kamehamehaevent.org/index.html

Island of Maui

June 18, 2011 – Na Kamehameha Commemorative Pa`u Parade
Front Street, Lahaina

June 18, 2011 – Ho`olaule`a, Kamehameha `Iki Park, Moku`ula & Waiola Church

Island of Kaua`i

June 18, 2011 – King Kamehameha Floral Parade in Lihu`e
Starting at Vidinha Stadium (Ho`olako Street), 10:00am

In San Francisco, CA celebrations will take place at the San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park.  For more information please click  here. 
Sources: Hawaii.gov and Star Advertiser

King Kamehameha Day: Two-Day Celebrations Throughout the Islands of Hawai’i

Tomorrow is the beginning of the two-day celebrations to mark King Kamehameha Day in Hawai’i and this year’s theme is Wahine Holo Lio.  For those who are unaware of about the history of this awesome day here is a short history lesson for you:

King Kamehameha Day was proclaimed in 1871 by King Kamehameha V, to honor his grandfather, King Kamehameha I. The first King Kamehameha Day was on June 11, 1872, and it was one of the first holidays to be proclaimed when Hawaii became a state in 1959. June 11, 2011 will be the 95th annual King Kamehameha Day in Hawaii.

The celebrations begin tomorrow, June 10, 2011, at Aliʻiōlani Hale in downtown Honolulu where there will be a lei draping ceremony honoring the great king at his statue along King St. (right across from I’olani Palace.)

Then on June 11, 2011, the 95th Annual Oahu King Kamehameha Day Parade will begin at 9am (beginning at King St.) until 12pm where it ends at Kapi’olani Park.  Once the parade ends there will be a feast of food, entertainment, and much more.

So, if you happen to be a Kama’aina or a tourist visiting Oahu during this two-day celebration why not stop by both events and enjoy!  Believe me, you will have fun.   🙂

Finally, the local channel, K5, in Hawai’i will be streaming the King Kamehameha Day parade live online beginning at 9am.  Click the link here to learn more.

Source: KFVE

Photo: Author’s own and Hawai\’i Magazine

A Lovely Article About the Late H.R.H. Princess Ka’iulani of Hawai’i

On April 13, 2011, writer Deborah O. Melvin wrote a nice article for the Big Island Weekly newspaper entitled,”The Shattered Vase, A Hula Drama”, about the late H.R.H. Princess Ka’iulani of Hawai’i and the new hula dance, The Shattered Vase by Kumu Paul Neves.

According to Ms. Melvin the new hula by Mr. Neves, “…focuses on the princess’adult life, her uncle King Kalakaua’s death, her aunt, Queen Lili’uokalani’s imprisonment in ‘Iolani Palace, and her trip from schooling in England to Washington, D.C.”

Please click the link here to read article in its entirety.   🙂

Photo courtesy of: Big Island Weekly

Remembering the 1856 Royal Wedding Between H.M. King Kamehameha IV and Queen Emma of Hawai’i

On Thursday April 28, 2011, KHON2 (a news station in Hawai’i) ran a video story about the 1856 royal wedding between King Kamehameha IV and Queen Emma of Hawai’i. There is also an accompanying article, which I found incredibly interesting, so I thought I would share this information with you all.

Here is a snippet from the KHON2 article:

… 155-years ago Hawaii had its own royal wedding.

‘The really biggest royal wedding that there was, was the wedding King Kamehameha IV and Emma which took place in June of 1856,’ said Bishop Museum archivist Desoto Brown.

The couple exchanged vows at Kawaiahao Church. A procession followed with men carrying Kahili – to signify this was a wedding of royalty.  Similar to how the nobility of Europe use coats of arms.

‘And people would have been watching from a respectful distance to take part in this event they were very proud of and happy about,’ said Brown.

The only depiction of the royal wedding in Bishop Museums’ collection is this sketch.  Brown says the celebration was seen as a positive an uplifting celebration for the people of Hawaii.

‘The marriage of two attractive, young Alii people was the cause for celebration.’

To mark the occasion – Queen Victoria of Great Britain sent Emma a veil, which she wore on her wedding day. And the bride most likely was dressed in a white wedding dress.

‘We don’t know the specifics but there would not have been a lot of competition as to what dress maker she was going to go to or anything like that,’ said Brown.

But it wasn’t only Queen Emma who had close ties to the British monarchy. In 1887 Queen Victoriacelebrated her Golden Jubilee and invited Hawaii’s reigning Queen Kapiolani and Princess Liliuokalani.


To watch the video clip and to read the article in its entirety please click the link here. 

Source: KHON2

Photos:  With permission from the Hawaii State Archives and my own.